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Simply Fun: Autism Awareness Month Game Review and Giveaway

Simply Fun: Autism Awareness Month Game Review and Giveaway

Disclaimer: I received one Tibbar’s Big Box of Words game and monetary compensation from Simply Fun for my review. All opinions are my own.

Tibbar’s Big Box of Words from Simply Fun came into our home at the right time. My six-year old son Angel who is on the autism spectrum is constantly walking around the house with his foam letters while spelling out words. This game was a chance for him to use words in a more structured manner. It teaches vocabulary, early reading, and early spelling. These are all skills that we have been working on with Angel, so I felt that this game would be great to help him in these areas.

Tibbar’s Big Box of Words comes with 10 letter cubes and 10 double sided spelling cards that range from easy to hard. The game also includes a You Spell It test block that can be used to block off the words on the card, so the child can spell them independently. Angel had some challenges spelling some of the words when I used this feature, so I decided to let him get used to spelling without it for now.

What drew me to this game was the game mapping process for children with autism. On Simply Fun’s Web site under the autism tab, they break down the different ways that Tibbar’s Big Box of Words will help a child who is on the spectrum. The game mapping process highlights the characteristic of the child and it asks if the game is appropriate for a child with this characteristic. Then it asks if the child can play without modification and finally it gives strategies for helping the child develop these compensatory skills.

So how did Angel like this game?  When I first took out the letter cubes, Angel’s first instinct was to stack them up. He loves blocks and he loves stacking. I had to redirect him to play the game appropriately. First, I modeled how to spell the words on the spelling cards using the letter cubes. Then, I read the word out loud. Next, I had Angel do the same.

Angel had to exhibit patience to find the correct letter to spell the word on the card. Providing positive reinforcement made a big difference. Whenever he got a word correct, his demeanor changed and he was motivated to continue. This game will also help him with reading phonetics and sight words.

I highly recommend Tibbar’s Big Box of Words for children who need to learn how to form words, spell, rhyme, match words to pictures, and read. I also suggest that you check out the game mapping process for children with autism to ensure that this game will be appropriate for your child. Remember to give positive reinforcement and rewards as needed. This will be a big help for children who are easily frustrated.

You can learn more about Tibbar’s Big Box of Words by clicking -> here.

Now that we have tried this game, I would love to give one of my lucky readers a chance to win it through our Autism Awareness Month Giveaway. Remember that you can enter daily. Good Luck.


Giveaway Terms: This giveaway is open to U.S. residents only, 18 years or older. One winner will be selected at random by PromoSimple. The winner will receive one Tibbar’s Big Box of Words (valued at $34), which will be shipped directly from Simply Fun. Entries will be accepted until 11:59 PM EST April 22nd and the winner will be announced on Facebook and Twitter on April 23rd. The winner will also be notified by email.

This giveaway is sponsored by Simply Fun and is being offered to you to in partnership with Sailing Autistic Seas.

Disclaimer: I received one Tibbar’s Big Box of Words game and monetary compensation from Simply Fun for my review. All opinions are my own.
Miz Kp
Written by Miz Kp

3 Comment responses

  1. Avatar
    April 19, 2014

    This should help my son – he is at the end of his teen years and low in language, speech, and cognitive development. I am willing to try something different, new, and which has promise.

    Reply

  2. Avatar
    April 19, 2014

    This game looks like a lot of fun. I actually played around with it and believe it or not, there are many things that the child is doing when they play this game. The child uses hi or her hands, eyes, and knowledge of words to arrange them. Not on the level of Scrabble yet, but it’s a start!

    Reply

  3. Avatar
    April 21, 2014

    Love how many different things you can do with one game!

    Reply

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